Tag Archives: texture

Sewing- mini tutorial – CHANEL JACKET TRIMS

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Sewing- mini tutorial – CHANEL JACKET TRIMS

Creating A Unique CHANEL-style trim

Last year I made my first Chanel-style jacket.  Finding a suitable trim, a hallmark of a Chanel, proved to be challenging.  I decided to try making my own.

I began with a skein of ribbon yarn and number 9 knitting needles.  Four stitches provided a nice width and using a basic stockinette stitch  I created a long strip.  Stockinette stitches tend to curl at the edges which works to advantage for hiding  hand stitching when applying the trim to the garment.

Creating a trim from ribbon yarn

Creating a trim from ribbon yarn

I would recommend making individual strips for each pocket and a continuous length for the center front and neckline.  By doing this it will reduce the chance of the trim unraveling at the edges during application and can more easily be tucked in at seam lines or pocket edges.  Otherwise, apply Fray Check or a fabric glue to secure the edges.

Once the trim is completed it can be attached by hand-stitching into position along the pockets, center front,neckline and sleeve edges.

Creating a unique trim for Chanel-style jacket

trim applied to sleeve edge

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Creating braids in fabric mosaic medium

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I think I’ve done it!

Wow, what a challenge creating a braid in fabric, but I think I’ve finally done it.

braid created in fabric mosaic medium

Hooray

One down, one to go.

Doing the happy dance!

I’m going to have to be very careful to make sure the second braid is cut so that it looks like it “belongs” with the first braid.  There is a lot of color variation in the fabric I’m using and it really shows way more than than I thought it would if it’s not done right… learned that the hard way.  I’m going to have to make careful visual comparisons to get it right.  Time to take a break before tackling that.

Maybe I’ll work on that luscious piece of purple linen I bought last week.   Hmm…

Fabric Art

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On Checking Out

It’s been several weeks since I posted anything on Sewville, and that’s because I’m knee-deep in a new fabric art project.  Here is a sneak peek of what I’m working on.

fabric art project

I still have some mountains to climb before completion, but I’m inching my way along and am hoping for good progress over the next few days/weeks.  Wish me luck!

I know I’m getting ready for re-entrybecause I find myself thinking about sewing Mandarin collars with increasing frequency. 🙂

Creating Unique Fabrics Out Of Scraps

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Repurposing Scraps – tutorial

I like the fabric that I used in my last coat so much that I wanted to utilize every little bit that I had left over. I’ve used this method of taking scraps and sewing them together to create a new piece of fabric before and it always proves to be an interesting effort.   I began by looking through my fabric and trims to see what I might have that would go with the piece I the main piece I was working around and came up with some pretty complements.  It’s amazing the bits and pieces I find that I have squirreled away for later use and then forget about; it’s always fun to rediscover them.

bits and pieces

Once I had gathered my materials selected, I cut a piece of bleached muslin to size to use as a base.  Organza would be a good substitute for muslin if you wanted something lighter weight, but I was thinking sturdy for a bag possibly.   The size of the muslin is determined by the length of scraps I am working with  Then I cut out my strips.  I organized the strips in a way that I thought looked interesting and then began to stitch them onto the muslin.

fabric strips

Beginning at the right edge I sew the first strip down face-up along the left side .  Place the second strip right sides together along the right edge of the first strip and sew down the right side with a 1/4″ seams securing both pieces.

stitch along right edge

Press the second strip out to the right and repeat the process until the base is completed.  I don’t worry too much about being perfect or staying on grain, because I like the somewhat random looking nature of the end result… that is part of the charm of this type of quilting.

  press to the right
Once the muslin backing was completed I added some burgundy cord for embellishment.
sewn strips completed

I then trimmed the piece to the edges of the muslin.

finished piece

I repeated this process and will be incorporating these strips into a bag or maybe a decor item.  Not sure yet.

Fashion – The Power of Color

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There is nothing like a splash of color to brighten up a dreary winter’s day.

Think boldly… think fuchsia and orange!

I had an hour to kill today and decided to go shopping at the local Macy’s.   I happened to be wearing a nice orange turtleneck that I received as a Christmas gift.  I really like the orange color, but don’t have too many things to wear it with.  I found some lovely scarves in the right color-range on an unbelievable mark-down price and couldn’t resist buying one.  I love the combination of pinks and orange together with a bit of green and gold sparkle … it was so pretty!

turtle neck and scarf

As I stood admiring the scarf against the orange sweater I was seeing it definitely needed a hot pink skirt to round out an outfit. My next stop was a browse through the fabric store where I  found the perfect piece of coordinating fuchsia fabric.  It’s a boucle wool with a little nubby texture that adds a bit of interest.  I picked up lining and a zipper and I’ll be ready to stitch it up in the morning.  Can’t wait to get started!

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Coat Making – Fabric Preparation

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Full Steam Ahead

When working with wool coating it is important to give the fabric a deep-steam treatment before beginning your pattern layout and cutting.  This can be done in several ways.  Before I had a steamer unit, I used a damp towel and iron which works fine, too.    Or, you can take it to the cleaners for steaming and pressing.

The main reason for applying steam is to reduce overall shrinkage that will occur during the heavy application of steam during the tailoring process.  Steam also makes the wool easier to manipulate into position when lining up plaids or stripes.applying steam to wool coating

After steaming I determine if the fabric has a direction or nap.   Rule number one when working with nap is whatever direction you choose to use, you must remain consistent cutting all pieces in the same direction.

Determining nap is much like petting a cat; it is more pleasing to stroke a kitty in the right direction.   I run my hand lightly along the surface feeling the direction of the fibers; one direction is soft and smooth while the opposite direction it feels like you’re petting a cat backwards.

find the fabric nap

I imagine myself smoothing out my coat in the back as I am about to sit down; I will want the fibers of my coat to smooth out in the “right” direction, too.  This tells me that to get the desired softness/smooth nap, I must lay my pattern pieces out with the nap going toward the hemline.

With steaming done and direction of the nap determined, I am ready for careful laying out of patterns, cutting and marking  notches.

pattern layout, measuring grain lines

careful cutting out

marking notches

Until next time… happy sewing!

Sewing with Fleece

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Preferring tailored clothing, I’m not usually drawn to synthetic outer wear fabrics, but I just couldn’t resist this charming fuzzy-floral-fleece in pink and gray.  I had it in my stash and kept it in reserve waiting for inspiration to surface.  I know it’s not particularly suitable to use a knit for a structured coat, but I could totally visualize this fun fabric as a coat and I was willing to take the risk.  And here is the result of my venture into sewing with synthetic fleece.  I love it!

I used Vogue 2472 coat pattern and interfaced it with a soft interfacing appropriate for knitted fabrics.

For lining the body of the jacket I used a gray polyester lining fabric

and a bit of pink for the pockets (using up pieces from my scrap pile).

I covered the large silver snaps in pink duppioni silk (I know, I know, but I couldn’t help it).

The collar is designed to lay flat

or stand-up, a feature I really appreciate as my neck tends to get cold easily on chilly days.
 And what I like most of all is that the jacket is warm and feels like you’re wrapped in a blanket …

 

while still retaining some style, fit and fashion.

Go Beaver football!

Sewing Decorator Pillows

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I saw a great blog entry by Bleak Midwinter on a table runner and pillows.  It inspired me to make more pillows, but sadly I have too many pillows already.   Here are a few that I particularly like.  I have a peculiar habit of giving them each names, like they are children.  As you can see, I love braided tassels and exquisite trims.  These are just a few of my favorites.  Enjoy!

Toiles des Empire