Tag Archives: remnantworks

Fabric Art

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On Checking Out

It’s been several weeks since I posted anything on Sewville, and that’s because I’m knee-deep in a new fabric art project.  Here is a sneak peek of what I’m working on.

fabric art project

I still have some mountains to climb before completion, but I’m inching my way along and am hoping for good progress over the next few days/weeks.  Wish me luck!

I know I’m getting ready for re-entrybecause I find myself thinking about sewing Mandarin collars with increasing frequency. 🙂

Sewing Classic Summer Apparel

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The Season of Casual Comfort

linen casual wear

I came across an old pattern in my pattern library from 1998.  I remember making the vest and not finishing it, because I didn’t like the fit…or lack of fit is more accurate.   I am always intrigued how something I once didn’t care for can take on a new life and become a new favorite; whoever said fashion is fickle was certainly onto something.  Rediscovery is always a good thing; it means I’m changing and growing and open to new ways of thinking.  I like that!

McCalls pattern

 I began with Mcall pattern 9278.  I used updated constructions methods which I talked about in my last post by eliminating the facing and using French seam applications on all interior seams and sleeves for a streamlined look.  To give support to the buttonhole areas I created small uniform patches and fringed the unfinished edges.
button patches
Behind the fashion button, I sewed a small support button to reduce wear on fabric.  You could also use small beads in a different color to add interest and artsy elegance, especially if you plan to wear the garment open.
button application
The hemline and center front edges were turned under 5/8 inches and stitched.  A bias binding made from the fashion fabric was applied to the sleeve opening and neckline.  I used a linen open weave pattern for the top applying the same constructions techniques.  It was quick and easy very versatile.
finishing detailslinen casual wear

Sewing with Vintage Buttons Something Old, Something New

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Something Old, Something New

A Vintage Button Adds Interest

Navy Linen Jacket and Slacks

Earlier this week I finished up another linen jacket over the same Kwik Sew pattern I used recently.  It’s plain and simple with a nice clean look.  To add some interest I found a special vintage button in my button stash that went perfectly and added a good bit of interest.  Years ago my Great Aunt Squeak (yes, that’s what we called her) gave me her rather large button collection.  I remember thinking it was a great gift at the time and I have used many of her buttons on various garments over the many years her collection has been in my care.  This particular button was a one of a kind and just the right size and color for the buttonhole and I imagine that Squeak would be happy to see that it is in use again.vintage buttonI am not a fan of pull-on pants; I don’t really know anyone who is.  When it comes to casual unlined linen pants, I put vanity aside  both because this style is easy to make, comfortable to wear and doesn’t need to be ironed if you don’t mind the wash and wear look that is so popular here in the northwest.  To go with my new jacket, I found a nice putty colored linen for coordinating pants.   To provide detail, I created a slit at the bottom side seam and added top stitching.  All in all not a bad look.

pant detail

Chanel-Style Suit

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In the Pink

We had the most glorious sunshine for Easter Sunday.   Upon arriving at the church, the first person I saw was dressed in the same shade of pink; fuchsia pink seemed to be the color of choice for the day and was liberally  sprinkled throughout the crowd along with lots of orange.  I hadn’t realized quite how up-to-the-minute-fashionable the color was and ended up feeling very au courant in my Chanel style Easter suit.  Woohoo!

Chanel suit, Easter morningHappy Easter !

 

Sewing with Linen

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A New Jacket For Springtime

jacket front view

Generally I don’t use Kwick Sew patterns much, not for any particular reason, I just am not that familiar with them.  Earlier this week while at the pattern counter in my local fabric store a helpful clerk  thrust the latest Kwik Sew book into my hands and was insistent that I look, so I did.  I don’t know if this is a new pattern or an older one, but I liked the look of and am happy to say it’s a breeze to sew with.  It couldn’t have been easier to put together and it fits nicely.

jacket pattern

The fabric you see is the photo is a great piece of linen I bought four or five years ago.  At the same time, I also purchased a yard of the striped fabric not knowing exactly how I would use it, but it picked up the colors in the main fabric well and I figured it would come in handy.

 I’m not a huge fan of the deep angled line on the front opening, so I adjusted that to be more traditional.  I also decided to apply simplified techniques I learned when sewing with Vogue American Designer, Adri.  For those of you who may not know of her, she uses simple elegant finishing techniques that are perfect for unlined linen garments.  I eliminated the two front facings in favor of the bias bound edge and used French seaming techniques for all the seam to add to the clean look of the interior.

French seam finishes

I removed 5/8 inch seam allowance (except for the hemline) around the entire jacked and applied the bias binding made from the striped fabric around the raw edges mitering at the corners.

bias binding

Because I eliminated the facing I had to add some stabilizer for the button and that was done by sewing a small interfaced square to the inside of the left side of the jacket front.

stabilizer for button

I was pleasantly surprised by how compatible the pattern was to the fabric.  They both have a bit of an Asian feel and I hadn’t really noticed that about the pattern until it was completed.  I’m thinking maybe I’ll make another in solid black.  

jacket back view

February Fashion Blaster

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Add warmth to your winter wardrobe

with this super hot color combination.

I’m loving my new fuchsia skirt made in wool boucle.  I just picked it up from the cleaners; a professional press makes such a difference in the finish of the garment.  Notice the short slit in the front seam line; sometime I put it in the back seam, but like to change it around every now and then just to keep things interesting.

 fuchsia skirt

In the back view I tried it with the fuchsia suede wedge shoes, but I think they draw the eye downward too much and are a bit clunky for the silhouette.  Back to the store they go!

skirt back view

To my surprise, I actually prefer the orange flats in the next photo.  Besides being more comfortable I think the orange is better visually, plus they are already part of my ever increasing shoe collection.  YAY!!!  I like it when I can used something I already own.  Now all I need to do is dig out my fuchsia handbag and I’m ready to rumble.

ready to roll