Tag Archives: natural fiber

Simplicity Sewing

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Simplicity Sewing

Purple or Periwinkle

I’ve been on the lookout for the right shade of purple to go with a skirt I’ve had for some time.  I found this interesting piece of embroidered linen that seemed like it would work.  I call it purple, but maybe it is periwinkle… I think periwinkle has more blue in it.

embroidered linen

Either way, it has turned out to be a good choice to go with my skirt.   I picked up a yard for the tunic pattern I’ve been using this summer.  I really like the simplicity of this pattern; I can complete it in an afternoon… no problem!

linen tunic and skirt

I found a piece of purple duppioni silk in my fabric stash to use as bias binding for the neck and armholes.  It’s a good feeling to use up a scrap of something I have on hand.

silk binding

It’s always fun to give a little update to something you’ve had and make it seem fresh and new again.The unstructured look with nothing-to-bind is perfect for staying cool on hot summer days.  I like wearing skirts, but often don’t want to feel “dressed-up.”  This look works for me, because it blends casual easy/no-care (what I jokingly refer to as rag-bag fashion) with the I-made-an-effort-today discipline that I try to adhere to.

summerwear

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Vintage Sewing – Tripping In Time

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Vintage Sewing – Tripping In Time

A Spin In The WABAC Machine

Dr. Peabody and Sherman at the  WABAC Machine

If you remember Mr. Peabody and Sherman, you just may be old enough to remember the influx of Indian fabrics into the American fashion scene that occurred during the fashion revolution of the late 60’s and 70’s.  Although that era has reappeared in contemporary  fashion and I’ve avoided it completely,  because of the been-there-done-that-it’s totally-hideous feeling that people often feel when fashions of their youth are recycled for succeeding generations.  Evidently enough time has passed, and even I can see the charm in this totally-funky-flower-power-paisley print that any self-respecting hippie would have loved.  The glitter packs a 21st century glitz that makes it seem fresh and fashionable.  And so… I gave it a try.

Peace and Love!

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I made it to wear during the warm weather, but it was cool out today, so I put a black turtle neck under it and that works perfectly making it something I’ll be able to wear year round.  How totally groovy🙂

flower power tunic

For those of you who may not be familiar with Mr. Peabody and Sherman, I have included a sampling of the kind of humor American kids of my generation grew up with.  Viewer Indiscretion Advised 🙂

Coat Making – Anatomy of a tailor tack

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Long and Short of Pattern Marking

“So, what exactly is a tailor tack?” you may ask.  There are different kinds of temporary stitches that tailors use, but the kind of tack I will demonstrate in this tutorial is a loopy stitch used in marking darts and other key points in garment construction.  With advances in technology tailor tacks have somewhat fallen out of fashion in favor of easier marking methods, such as washable markers and those that disappear with heat.   These are great for most fabrics, but for woolens and the some of the more delicate materials that may not tolerate chemical markers, making hand applied tailor tacks provides a sound option.

A tailor tack is made while the tissue pattern in still pinned to the face fabric.  Begin by locating the circles marking the dart.  Take a stitch through all three layers bringing the needle back up through to the surface leaving a 1 1/2″ – 2″ tail.

tailor tack

Repeat this step creating a large loop of thread of thread.  Snip off to create another tail.

making a tailor tack

Snip loop in center.

tailor tacks

Completed tailor tack.

creating a tailor tack

Repeat this process for each circle marking in the dart.

Imaking a tailor tack

Once darts and other desired marking are completed carefully remove tissue pattern piece.

making tailor tacks

The remaining two pieces of face fabric are joined by the tailor tack.  Gently lift the top piece from the bottom piece and clip the threads to release the two pieces being careful not to dislodge the marking threads.

making tailor tacks

With tailor tacks completed, I am now ready to apply interfacing to the face fabric.

Until next time, happy sewing!

Sewing Tutorial – Creating a bias binding finish

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I started working on this silk jacket a long time ago.  It is finished except for finishing the interior seams of each armhole.   An unlined jacket should look as finished on the inside as it does on the outside.  A bias binding applied to raw edges creates a couture finish detail that is very pleasing.

1.  Begin by removing threads or fraying from the raw edge.

2. Create a 3″ bias strip out of left over fabrics and fold in half.

3.  Pin the folded bias strip around the armhole with the raw edges of the bias and garment together.

4.  Stitch using the armhole seam line as a guide.

5.  Trim the excess from armhole edge leaving a scant 3/8″.

6. Pin the finished bias edge in place along interior sleeve using seam line as a guide. (You could also use a basting thread instead of pins.)

7.  Carefully stitch the finished bias edge in place along pinned edge.

8. Finished seam looks beautiful and also serves as a little shoulder support giving shape to the seam line without the use of shoulder pads.

9. Finish the raw edges of the neckline using the same bias strip application.

10.  Pin the  bias strip in place with raw edges together.

11.  Stitch bias strip in place using the neckline seam as a guide.

12. Trim the neckline edge to a scant 1/4″.

13.  Pin the bias strip in place and stitch along finished edge of strip.

14.  The finished interior neckline creates a clean finish.

15.  Completed jacket with inside couture finishes.