Tag Archives: fabrics

A JUST FOR FUN – Halloween Project.

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A JUST FOR FUN – Halloween Project.

I am not a serious quilter, but I do on occasion like to make little quilts for wall decoration.  Being that Halloween is just around the corner, I thought it would be fun to see what I could make from my left-over fabric scraps.  My goal was to create something interesting using only things that I had on-hand… without making additional purchases!

After sorting through my stash, I came up with this collection of possibilities.fullsizeoutput_ba9

Considering overall design, scale, color, etc., with size of pieces available, I selected the jack-o-latern motif fabric as the center-piece with coordinating strips for the sides to be sewn in a log cabin pattern.

fullsizeoutput_baaAfter assembling the pieces, I hand basted the decorative block to a piece of muslin to give added support for the embellishment to come.

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Then it was into the embroidering hoop for adding decorative features.

fullsizeoutput_bafI began by placing small orange and black beads on the bottom and top sections.  They are a little small and tend to get lost, in the photos I taken, but show quite well when examining the piece in person.

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More beads.IMG_6087

Next I added cross stitches and French knots to the skeleton fabric.

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And lastly, I  finished up with orange and green primitive stitches on the last side piece.

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I added a black border and chalked in guide lines for more primitive stitching to be added.

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Once the decorative block was embellish, I layered it over cotton batting and an orange contrasting fabric.

 

 

All additional stitching, such as the outlining on the jack-o-latern and more French knots were sewn through all layers to secure the sandwiched pieces.

 

 

After all the embellishing, I trimmed the excess fabric away and machine stitched the bias binding, also made from scraps, to the outside edge of the piece.

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The binding was applied to the front and then wrapped around to the back side and hand basted into position for a final stitching down.

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Special attention was paid to the mitered corners to help create nice and neat finished look.

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With matching thread, I used teeny tiny stitches to secure the  binding and corners into position.

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After the binding was completed, I pressed it lightly.  If desired, small plastic rings may be sewn in the top corners for hanging if desired.

This fun little project measures 12 1/2″ x 12 1/2″ and will be hanging in my work station between now and October 31st.

I hope you like it!

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Coat Making Tutorial – part 4 coat linings

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A Classic Pea Coat

Lining and Interior Finish

I selected a polyester fabric with a satin finish for my lining.   I actually prefer rayon linings especially when working with natural fibers, but I wasn’t able to find  the color I needed to complement the face fabric, so I opted for a synthetic.  In this tutorial, I will go over how to put in a lining with emphasis on  finishing details.

Step 1.  Once the lining is assembled, top stitch the seam line of the sleeve sewing on the sleeve piece (not the body of the lining) catching the seam allowance underneath.

Step 2.  With stitching completed,  turn to the inside and trim away the excess seam allowance.

Step 3.  On right side of fabric, pinch press seam and roll stitched line into sleeve.

Step 4.  Press entire seam to encourage the sleeve to roll towards the sleeve edge to create a smooth interior finish.  This helps the lining “ride” over the interior seam of the coat sleeve.

This shows the nice clean line you will get once it has been pressed.

Step 5.  Double breasted garments often include interior buttonholes on the inside facing to hold the front of coat in place.  Sew in buttonholes before attaching lining (it’s a lot easier before than after).  I use my machine for  buttonholes, because they will not be seen when wearing.Careful measuring for proper alignment is very important in this step.  

Step 6.  Attach back facing to collar at the neckline edge using hand stitching.

Step 7.  Insert shoulder pads and hand stitch into position.

Step 8.  Press 5/8 inch seam allowance under on sleeve edges and at the bottom of the lining before attaching it to the coat.

Step 9.  Pin lining to interior front and neck facings and stitch into position.

Step 10.  Use a machine basting stitch to sew in the lining in.  A long stitch is easier to remove for alterations or lining replacement. Leave an opening near the bottom of the front facing as shown below.

Step 11.  Turn lining to right side out and lightly press edges down, being careful not to over press.  Stitch lining at hem edge first and press, Then slip stitch down on both front facings as shown below.

Step 12.  Sew interior buttons into position using a flat button utility button.

Step 11.  Sew fashion buttons on front of coat paying careful attention to alignment.

Step 12.  Take to dry cleaners for a final press.  A professional press really adds to the look of the garment by smoothing out all construction wrinkles.  It is a must for any tailored garment.

So, it’s off to the cleaners.  Until next time, Happy Sewing!

Sewing With Fine Fabrics

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Completing my fuchsia linen dress has inspired me to make another one in black. With that in mind I decided to visit one of my favorite fabric places for apparel fabric, Mill End Store.  Mill End claims to have the largest display of fabric in America and between their Beaverton and Milwaukie stores, I can believe that may just be true.  Mill End really is an incredible textile resource; I’ve spent many happy hours perusing their beautiful fabrics, trims and notions.  If you ever visit Portland, it’s a definite go to place for fine fabric aficionados.

So, off to the store to see what I could find.  These are a few of the options I was presented with.

               

OMG, look at this trim!                                                                 And more trims!

     

I adored the black and white trim and started visualizing how I could use it, but stopped short remembering that I was going to be making a little black dress which implies simplicity, elegance and restraint.  Argh, I resisted temptation and walked past the gorgeous trims counter.

After enjoying a quick look around to see what was new, I selected a medium weight black linen and rayon lining which Maureen graciously cut for me.

     

I picked up an invisible zipper, some black thread and headed for the register.   Success!

Now all I have to do is find the time to make it.