Monthly Archives: November 2012

Sewing on Velveteen

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The Velveteen Jacket

(or How Clothes Become Real)

I recently purchased a pair of leggings.   I know leggings have been popular for a while now, but sometimes I am slow to warm up to current fashion.  Lots of women wearing  lycra and let it all hang out, but I’m not really comfortable with that, so I decided I needed something with a bit more coverage.  I thought about making a long tailored jacket (and I still may do that), but I have been short on time lately so decided to work with a relatively simple pattern that would be quick and easy.  With that in mind I decided to use my tried and true Tribeca jacket pattern with a few inches added to the length.

1.  I started with some printed black velveteen that I had in my stash. I found a nice black shimmery satin for the interior and a complementary rayon-acetate to use as a bias binding.  The rayon-acetate is quite subtle, although it looks less so in the photo below because of the flash on the silver threads.

2.  The Tribeca jacket has a neckline that opens back on itself and it is perfect for two-sided fabrics, but not so suitable to one-sided fabrics like velveteen.  Because of this feature, I had to find an interior fabric to face the velveteen with.  That is where the shimmery satin comes in.

3.  To secure the face fabric with the interior required careful basting of the two pieces so that they could be handled as one piece of fabric.  This step has to be done with care to ensure that the two pieces lie flat with no wrinkling occurring.   It’s not hard, just time consuming.


4.  Once the interior was secured to the face fabric, the darts were sewn in and French seams applied on all seams.  French seams are not the usual technique for most jackets t but I really like this finish for an unstructured jacket… it’s very clean.  Even the sleeve is inserted with a French seam application which not only looks great, but also provides structure along the seam line much like a mini-shoulder pad would.

French side seam application

French seam on set-in sleeve

5.  Once the jacket was constructed, I created a bias seam binding to apply as a finishing detail.  To find the bias of a fabric you fold a straight edge back on itself at a right angle; the folded edge is on the bias.  Bias is used in bindings because it shapes more easily around curves and contours.

6.  Apply bias to edge with raw edges of garment and bias together, mitering the corners.  Basting stitches remain in place until after the bias binding is applied.

7.  I applied the binding with machine stitching and hand stitched it into place.  I take the time to stitch by hand (and it does take quite a bit longer) because it allows for more control over the fabric, but this is optional, it can certainly be stitched down by machine if you prefer that look.

8.  I then made decorative buttonhole patches, and hand stitched them into position.

9.  I recycled buttons I had used on a coat I made serveral years ago.  They are a dark gray and silver combination and work perfectly for this jacket.

The loose style and all the handwork gives this jacket a certain Bohemian feeling that works well with leggings.  This jacket gives me good coverage, but still feels fashionable which is what I was trying to achieve.

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Sacred Music – A Portal to the Sublime

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Agnus Dei

A Reverie for the Spirit

I first heard this piece a couple of days ago while watching an old episode of Midsomer Murders … of all places.  It is a contemporary piece written as part of the soundtrack for the episode.  I was surprised to learn this, because I thought it sounded more 18th century than modern.  All the better to know that there are still people in the world who are gifted with delicate sensibilities requisite to the creation of ethereal beauty.  Thank you, Jim Parker, for your exquisite composition.

Creative Photo-editing; Confessions of a PicMonkey Junkie

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Circles, Circles, Circles

I recently read an article in a quilting magazine that said circles are popular!  With that, I decided to have a go at circle making to see what the appeal was.  I have lots of fabric scraps left over from various art projects (Chieko Mamba) which I used for this project.  On the surface this type of work seems too simple to be very interesting, but I was a surprised to learn there is more to putting the fabrics together in a pleasing way than I thought.

First I made a 7″ x 7″ square and then applied the circle design.  I cut a 9″ x 9″ square of contrasting fabric as a back which would leave 1″ on all sides to fold up for a binding.  I sandwiched a piece of batting in between the front and back and stitched into place.  Below are the results… nice, but nothing to get too excited about.  I knew what I had to do… make an appointment with Dr. PM.

Serengeti

Here is what the original looks like after going bananas with the PicMaster... who just happens to be my new  BFF!

Blue Serengeti 

It could be an Italian mosaic or  French Country curtains or whatever…

Blue Serengeti framed miniature

Actually, this does get me excited; I am so intrigued by the endless possibilities of photo-editing… it’s just amazing what can be done with an original image to make it more interesting or just different for the sake of being different. I’ve added a gallery of miniatures at RemnantWorks where customers can choose a design and then have it printed in any color that suits their decor.  What a great option to provide!

Creative Photo Editing – The Great PicMonkey Adventure

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Tales of Photo Editing

OK, I know my last post was a showcase for Lady Christmas, but since publishing that entry, I’ve been deep diving into the depths of the PicMonkey pool.   I’ve uploaded, downloaded, and am pretty much overloaded, but after much trial and error and hours sitting in front of the computer screen (I’ve been at it for two days straight. well, PicMonkey and Spoonflower both), I’ve managed to create some interesting photo-collages that I want to market for Christmas.  I’m really quite excited about the potential for application of this very cool online tool and if you’ve never used it, be sure to visit PicMonkey and check it out.

Here is the result of my PicMonkey adventure… an 8″ x  8″ print that is just in time for the holidays.  I hope you like her!  And if you do, you can help me by sharing my RemnantWorks link on your favorite social media site.   That would be soooo nice of you all… I will “heart you” forever.   🙂